GIANT SCREEN FILMS PRESENT

WILD OCEAN SPECIES

"Over 10, 000 plant and animal species - almost 15% of the coastal species known worldwide - are found in South African waters, with about 12 % of these occurring nowhere else... It is estimated that 80% of the world's tanker traffic passes South Africa's coast." South African Government Information

SARDINES

are small silvery fishes that grow very quickly to reach a length of just under 20 centimeters. Because of their small size, they group together when threatened as a natural defense mechanism constantly swimming and rearranging themselves in dazzling patterns to disorient predators. Sardines filter the water for tiny plants and animals called plankton as the source of their nutrition.

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CAPE GANNETS

are large seabirds that have snow-white bodies with black tails. They also have a distinctive golden crown and nape. They grow to about 90 centimeters long and weigh about 2.6 kilograms. A gannet can travel as far as 100 kilometers over the ocean in search of food. When it sees its prey, it can dive as far as 10 meters beneath the surface.

CapeGannets

CAPE FUR SEALS

are among the largest fur seals in the world and are more closely related to sea lions—with their ability to walk on all fours, external ears, and a dense coat of fur on their underbelly—than they are to other seals. Despite their size, they have a natural ability to hunt, diving over 200 meters below the ocean surface, holding their breath for as long as 7.5 minutes.

AFRICAN PENGUINS

live in colonies on small islands along the coast. Adult males average 70 centimeters in length and 4 kilograms in weight. Their bodies are aerodynamic, helping them dive and swim very quickly in pursuit of their prey—small fish and crustaceans. That speed also helps them flee from their predators— Cape Fur Seals and sharks.

SHARKS

There are more species of shark off the South African coast than anywhere else in the world: Copper Heads (also known as Bronze Whalers), Blacktips and Duskies all feature in the film. Once mature, the only predator that a shark has to fear is human. This means that these sharks are “apex predators,” occupying a dominant position in the food web.

BlackTipGold

COMMON DOLPHINS

are easily recognisable by their distinctive black back and a cape which forms a v-shaped saddle. They feed on small fish like Sardines and squid. The Dolphin makes a very fast clicking sound—several hundred clicks per second—to send out sound waves which bounce off of objects in its path. It hears the “echoes” when the sound waves bounce back and processes the echoes into a three-dimensional image of the object.

CommonsBowsurfing

BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS

have a short rounded snout, described as bottle-shaped, and a smooth rounded head. Groups of Bottlenose Dolphins will also work together to trap shoals of fish, making it easier for all of them to eat. Sometimes, a Bottlenose will use its tailfin to “whack” a fish to stun it and make it easier to eat.

Bottlenose

HUMPBACK WHALES

stocky, humped, black bodies are covered with lumps called tubercles, which are actually hair follicles and are characteristic of the species. Adult females average 16 meters in length and 40,000 kilograms in weight. A Humpback can live for 50 years, if it succeeds in avoiding its predators. Once a Humpback reaches maturity, its only real predator is human. As filter feeders, Humpbacks use their baleen to eat only small fish, plankton, krill, and other tiny crustaceans.

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